This arti­cle is part 2 of 4 in the series Abandoned Clark County

This is the sec­ond in a series doc­u­ment­ing some of Clark County’s aban­doned places.

Several weeks ago at the library, I stum­bled upon a book called Abandoned Kentucky by Jay Farrell.  According to the author, “Abandoned struc­tures are places that open the imag­i­na­tion and invite inter­pre­ta­tion.  While often over­looked by passers-by, their skele­tal remains act as the per­fect sub­ject for the cam­era, qui­et­ly wait­ing to be cap­tured and shared.”

Farrell, a Nashville res­i­dent, focused his cam­era on south­ern and west­ern parts of Kentucky.  The need to seek aban­doned struc­tures in Clark County fair­ly hollered out at me.  So with Clare at the wheel and me behind the lens, we were off.  With so many tar­gets of oppor­tu­ni­ty, the results will have to be shared in a sequence of WinCity articles.

[Editor’s note: This image gallery dis­plays well on desk­top or lap­top com­put­ers and larg­er mobile devices. On phones, the expe­ri­ence will be degrad­ed; we apol­o­gize for this, but it’s sim­ply a lim­i­ta­tion of the gallery soft­ware we employ and the real­i­ties of dis­play­ing images with text.]

Old Chism Store

Old Chism Store

The old Chism Store still stands at the inter­sec­tion of Red River Road and White-Conkwright Road. At one time, dozens of coun­try stores like this dot­ted the landscape.

Midway Colored School

Midway Colored School 

Midway Colored School is locat­ed on Midway Road, just off Route 89 near Trapp. The Midway Colored Baptist Church stands beside it (not shown). In 1910 the church deed­ed three-quar­ters of an acre to the Board of Education for a school build­ing. At some lat­er date, Midway School was opened at anoth­er site on Red River Road.

McMillan Graveyard

McMillan Graveyard

The McMillan Graveyard is total­ly over­grown with trees and shrubs but the grave­stones have been pro­tect­ed from live­stock by a stur­dy stone fence. This bur­ial ground of the pio­neer McMillan family—James McMillan Sr. (1720–1799)—lies at the north end of the WMU reservoir.

Old steps

Old steps

All over the coun­ty you can find steps like these that once led to a house now gone.

Elkin house

Elkin house

The ruins of this 18th-cen­tu­ry house still stand on a farm on Boonesboro Road. Located in the Bush Settlement, it is believed to have been built for Zachariah Elkin, a son of Rev. Robert Elkin, first pas­tor of Providence Church.

Old privy

Old privy

This dilap­i­dat­ed struc­ture is an aban­doned privy, a once nec­es­sary facil­i­ty for every home.

Oakwood

Oakwood

This show­place brick man­sion was built for Alpheus Lewis (1799−1865) in the ear­ly 19th cen­tu­ry. The house, locat­ed on pri­vate prop­er­ty on Wades Mill Road, has been aban­doned for many years. 

Old car

Old car

Though not par­tic­u­lar­ly his­toric, aban­doned vehi­cles and farm machin­ery make inter­est­ing pho­tographs. This old car is rust­ing away on Prewitt Lane, off Flanagan Station Road.

Old shop on Waterworks

Old shop on Waterworks

Sometimes it’s hard to tell if a build­ing is aban­doned or just bad­ly run down. This con­crete block struc­ture is locat­ed on Waterworks Road (at the cross­ing of West Fork).

McEldowney auto house

McEldowney auto house

This struc­ture is shown on the 1912 Sanborn Insurance Map as an “auto house” locat­ed on the alley behind the McEldowney man­sion. Now the prop­er­ty of the Bluegrass Heritage Museum, it may be bet­ter clas­si­fied as “cur­rent­ly unused” than “aban­doned.” Many such struc­tures may be found along Winchester’s near­ly 10 miles of alleys.

Quisenberry House

Quisenberry House

Ancient hous­es like this half stone-half wood exam­ple on Flanagan Station Road stir the imag­i­na­tion. One can­not help but won­der about the sto­ries it could tell. Thought to have been built by Joel Quisenberry, a son of Rev. James Quisenberry, who set­tled near­by in 1784.

Gatehouse

Gatehouse

The old Leggett & Platt visitor’s gate­house is anoth­er unused/abandoned struc­ture. It stands on North Main Street (near Maple Expressway), cur­rent site of the Harry Gordon Steel Company.

  • Harry is a Mt. Sterling native who has lived in Clark County since1999. He has a pas­sion for the past and has researched and writ­ten exten­sive­ly about the his­to­ry of this area.

Series Navigation« Abandoned Clark County: Part oneAbandoned Clark County: Part three »