This arti­cle is part 3 of 4 in the series Abandoned Clark County

This is the third in a series doc­u­ment­ing some of Clark County’s aban­doned places.

Several weeks ago at the library, I stum­bled upon a book called Abandoned Kentucky by Jay Farrell.  According to the author, “Abandoned struc­tures are places that open the imag­i­na­tion and invite inter­pre­ta­tion.  While often over­looked by passers-by, their skele­tal remains act as the per­fect sub­ject for the cam­era, qui­et­ly wait­ing to be cap­tured and shared.”

Farrell, a Nashville res­i­dent, focused his cam­era on south­ern and west­ern parts of Kentucky.  The need to seek aban­doned struc­tures in Clark County fair­ly hollered out at me.  So with Clare at the wheel and me behind the lens, we were off.  With so many tar­gets of oppor­tu­ni­ty, the results will have to be shared in a sequence of WinCity articles.

[Editor’s note: This image gallery dis­plays well on desk­top or lap­top com­put­ers and larg­er mobile devices. On phones, the expe­ri­ence will be degrad­ed; we apol­o­gize for this, but it’s sim­ply a lim­i­ta­tion of the gallery soft­ware we employ and the real­i­ties of dis­play­ing images with text.]

115 E. Lexington Ave.

115 E. Lexington Ave.

This build­ing at the cor­ner of Lexington Avenue and Hodgkin Alley is some­thing of a mys­tery. Erected in the 1940s as an apart­ment build­ing, it has been unoc­cu­pied for many years. The city came close to demol­ish­ing it, but last year a new own­er start­ed mak­ing improve­ments. At this time, it still appears to be abandoned.

William Taylor House

William Taylor House 

William Taylor, an ear­ly cloth man­u­fac­tur­er, lived on Lower Howard’s Creek. His house, pic­tured here in the 1970s, is one of the numer­ous stone struc­tures built in the Bush Settlement. (pho­to­graph from the Robert F. Collins Collection)

Taylor House ad in the Kentucky Gazette

Taylor House ad in the Kentucky Gazette

The house dates from before 1802, the year Taylor offered it for sale along with his fulling mill, grist mill, still house and farm.

Taylor House 2005

Taylor House 2005

The old house, long aban­doned, is slow­ly suc­cumb­ing to the elements.

William Clinkenbeard House

William Clinkenbeard House

This his­toric house, which still stands on Paris Road, was the res­i­dence of William Clinkenbeard, one of the first set­tlers of Strode Station. Clinkenbeard left an inter­est­ing rec­ol­lec­tion of ear­ly times in Clark County.

Greenhouse

Greenhouse

This green­house, for­mer home of Winchester Florists on Old Boonesboro Road, has not been a going con­cern for many years. 

Barn on Waterworks Road

Barn on Waterworks Road

Old barns pro­vide excel­lent pho­to oppor­tu­ni­ties. This one is bare­ly stand­ing on Waterworks Road.

Barn on Paris Road

Barn on Paris Road

Clark County has many pic­turesque old barns like this one on Paris Road.

Barn on Old Boonesboro Road

Barn on Old Boonesboro Road

This derelict barn on Old Boonesboro Road stands on farm­land that has been con­vert­ed to a rur­al res­i­den­tial area.

Garage at Sewell Shop

Garage at Sewell Shop

This garage on Mt. Sterling Road appears to be aban­doned. It is close to the site of the now demol­ished Sewell Shop and the Sewell House that stood nearby.

House at Jackson Street and Jefferson

House at Jackson Street and Jefferson

William Gilbert, a Winchester gro­cer, pur­chased the cor­ner lot at Jackson and Jefferson Streets in 1907 and built a house on it. In recent years this attrac­tive house fell into dis­re­pair and was aban­doned. I took this pic­ture about a year ago. When I went back last week to get an up-to-date pho­to, I found only an emp­ty lot.

Redmond House

Redmond House

The Redmond House stands about a half mile back off the road to Mt. Sterling (US 60). The Kentucky Heritage Council esti­mat­ed the old­est por­tion was built about 1790; they got the house list­ed on the National Register of Historic Places. That was not enough to save it, how­ev­er, as it appears to be head­ed downhill.

Vanmeter House

Vanmeter House

This house on Paris Road belong­ing to William Vanmeter is shown on an 1877 map of Clark County, but is miss­ing from the 1861 map. At present the house is being allowed to return to nature.

Root cellar

Root cellar

This stone struc­ture on Mt. Sterling Road appears to be the remains of an old root cel­lar. The house that once went with it is long gone.

  • Harry is a Mt. Sterling native who has lived in Clark County since1999. He has a pas­sion for the past and has researched and writ­ten exten­sive­ly about the his­to­ry of this area.

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